Sunday, June 26, 2011

New writing for 2011

Hi everyone,

Here's a few links to some of my recent writing:

Psychology Today
http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/your-brain-work

Harvard Business Review
http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/05/the_conversation_is_over_long.html

Huffington Post
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-rock

Announcing the Healthy Mind Platter

The healthy mind platter for optimal brain matter.

The US government has just revised the food pyramid - the diagram that's been with us for decades that is supposed to remind people how to eat well. The model needed a revision, and the new version, called ChooseMyPlate, is a big improvement.

However, there's a different epidemic happening out there that's getting less attention, perhaps because it is less obvious than the epidemic of obesity we're experiencing. We're entering an era of an epidemic of overwhelm. A time when too many people's mental well-being is being stretched through multi-tasking, fragmented attention and information overload.

The trouble is, we are short on simple, clear information about good mental habits. Few people know about what it takes to have optimum mental health, and the implications of being out of balance. It is not taught in schools, or discussed in business. The issue just isn't on the table. The result is that we stretch ourselves in ways that may have even bigger implications than an unhealthy physical diet.

Read more at www.healthymindplatter.com

Time for a new science of leadership?

Want to be a leadership researcher? All you need are eyes and ears, and the ability to notice and describe patterns. Or if you want to test your theories, just set up some social science experiments.

This situation is good for the publishing industry - an Amazon search shows 60,352 books in the 'leadership' category - but there are still huge gaps in our understanding of leadership. We still don't know if it's more about traits, attributes and competencies, or about what followers need. Leadership development still involves a lot of guesswork. As a result, organizations don't have enough good leaders, and some of the leaders we have do some pretty unintelligent things (like betting the housing market will go up forever.)

Neuroscience research is helping fill in critical gaps. While we are nowhere near being able to scan a leader's brain while running a meeting (even if that was a good idea), we can study some of the building blocks of what leaders do - making decisions under pressure, solving complex problems, negotiating a transaction, or trying to persuade others. There are been some big surprises in the research.

Read the full story on Psychology Today